Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery

Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery

By Mark Wilson, May 24, 2010 03:19 PM

Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Shot outside of my house looking strait into the sun at sunset.
Camera made from a Napoleon Dynamite lunchbox
Shot on Ilford 5×7 Photographic paper (ISO 6) for about 2 minutes
Tray developed at home in about 10 minutes, scanned and inverted.
-Matt McDaniel
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Matt McDaniel’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Polaroid home made pinhole camera, with expired Type-665, cleared in mugi-cha.
-Skorj.
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Skorj’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
taken with a modified cheap point-and-shoot, which I think is the most elegant way into pinhole. You just take a scrap camera which has a sliding lens cover, remove the lens and sliding cover interlock, and replace lens with a pinhole in a piece of aluminium can (photo available if you like)
-Peter Wendes
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Weeping Buddha shot on an overcast day. Custom built lens board out of cardboard, gaffers tape and aluminum duct tape pierced with a 1mm needle. Placed in a Speedgraphic 4×5. Film was Polaroid type 55 positive/negative instant film. Exposure was about 10 seconds.
-Jay
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Jay’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Shot with a P-Sharan pinhole kit camera I built a few years ago. Settings – there are none… ~2-3 second exposures.
-Randy Kato
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Randy Kato’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Color film 35mm ISO400.
f60.
15 minutes exposure.
I attached the camera to the rear view mirror in my car and exposed the film while the car was moving. The shooting was at night.
-Donato Amézquita.
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Donato Amézquita’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
This shot is of several 4-leaf clovers I snagged out of my parents backyard. I thought I needed some luck since everything was going poorly. I liked this double exposure the best because it was so different. Exposure 63 seconds each time.
-Ashley Winder
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Ashley Winder’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Kodak BW400CN film, 1 second exposure, partly cloudy day.
Konica Autoreflex TC camera from the 1970s.
Parts: cardboard, small piece of soda can with a literal pinhole, and electrical tape. Takes less than 15 minutes to build.
When the shutter speed is set to “B” the shutter stays open as long as the release is held. I bracketed with separate 1, 2, 4, and 8 second exposures.
Negatives scanned with a Nikon 5000 ed.
-David Lee
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
David Lee’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
-Crystal Boomgaart
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Crystal Boomgaart’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
This is a shot of Philadelphia taken from Spring Garden St. looking East with the Schuylkill river in the foreground. The rig itself was built using the cardboard from the back of a legal pad, a can of Natty Light (for the pinhole), and some red electrician’s tape.
-Brad Fitzpatrick
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Brad Fitzpatrick’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Friday night I built my pinhole camera . I used a fedex envelope, black gaffers tape, and my old Texas drivers license.
-Christopher Longwood
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Christopher Longwood’s Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
This is a picture of a street in downtown Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Wooden pinhole camera. Approximately 20x16x15cm (w x h x d). Pinhole made in a piece of an arizona grean tea can by making a dimple and sanding it down until a hole forms. 1 minute exposure on expired Ilford B&W paper. Paper loaded in an S fashion in the camera
-Omar Kuwas
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
Omar Kuwas’ Pinhole Camera
Shooting Challenge: Pinhole Gallery
The camera I used was made out of a long cardboard box it give a ultra wide field of view (it takes 5 shots on a 24 exp roll) and the pinhole was made by using a needle to drill a hole in some tin foil and then sanding down the edges to get it thin as possible. The film is wound on my inserting a key into the receiving canister and the blue tape is used to hold tension in the film.
I calculated the aperture to be around f.256 so when shooting I metered using a Fujica ST605 and worked out exposure times using a conversion chart and then doubled it to compensate for reciprocity failure

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